Defiant Boris Johnson to throw out Remainer plot to gain secret no deal Cabinet messages

BORIS JOHNSON is set to defy Remainer MPs' latest attempt to tie the Government's hand in the Brexit negotiations by demanding private communications between Cabinet advisers and ministers on no deal Brexit preparations be published.

Treasury Minister Simon Clarke told BBC Radio 4's Today Programme will find ways to ensure "common sense is preserved" in the releasing of crucial confidential information the Government holds on no deal preparations. It comes after MPs voted in favour of a motion tabled by former Tory MP Dominic Grieve to publish all analyses and conversations held by Government's ministers on prorogation of Parliament and no deal plans.

Mr Clarke said: “We will respond to the implications of this vote in due course but the scope of the information requested in the humble address is disproportionate and it is unprecedented.

“We do have to preserve a degree of common sense when it comes to the advice that ministers receive and how that’s disseminated.

“Dominic Grieve is a great believer in human rights and he has yesterday sponsored an attempt to ensure that the private content of messages of the advisers is disclosed to Parliament.

“Where does this end if this is a precedent that we establish.”

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Brexit news: Boris Johnson will 'test law' on releasing Government's confidential communication (Image: GETTY)

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Brexit news: Treasury Minister Simon Clarke claims Government will challenge decision to extend Brexit talks (Image: UK PARLIAMENT)

The Government is always committed to upholding the rule of law

Simon Clarke

Asked whether the Government will challenge the decision legally or simply ignore the vote, he replied: “The Government won’t be ignoring it, the Government will consider how best to respond to this in a way that’s proportionate and sensible.

“We do clearly have a duty to respond to the humble addresses, that’s a convention that’s been established.

“But at the same time, there is a broader public interest in allowing communications to remain confidential between advisers and ministers.”

Challenged on whether the Prime Minister also intends to respect the law and ask for a Brexit extension should a deal fail to be reached by October 19 - as required of him by a new law approved by Parliament on Monday - the Treasury Minister replied: “The Government is always committed to upholding the rule of law under this Government as any other.

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Britain's constitution explained (Image: EXPRESS)

“But we will make sure we’re maintaining our commitment that we are leaving the European Union on the 31st of October.

“There is absolutely no case for the vote for an extension.”

He added: “First and foremost we are going to continue to negotiate very hard to secure a good deal.

“That remains the Government’s primary purpose and that absolutely is the spirit in which we undertake these negotiations.

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Brexit referendum results mapped (Image: EXPRESS)

“But we will also test this law. We will try to find ways to make sure the Government keeps all options open.

“Parliament has done its best to frankly tie the Government’s hand and enacted in a way which I believe is contrary to the national interest because it has made securing a good deal harder.

“It has restricted our options but we remain absolutely clear that we are leaving on the 31st of October.”

Boris Johnson has prorogued Parliament to extend the annual conference recess until October 14. 

The Prime Minister lost his second attempt to call for a snap election on Monday night and will return to Brussels on October 17 for his last chance to get a deal with the EU in time for an October 31 exit.